Cindy Block

Cindy Block


Embodied Practice® Certified Teacher, School of Embodied Practice; Faculty: University of Toronto Drama Center and George Brown Theatre School; Member of ACTRA and CAEA; MFA in Acting, York University, Toronto, Ontario; Voice Teaching Diploma, York University, Toronto, Ontario

Cindy Block’s artistic research includes extensive study in, and application of, the practice of Authentic Movement. Cindy’s research has led to writing, performance and collective creation for the stage, a Master’s Thesis, a one-woman show, and her membership in The Cassandra Project, a creative performance and social collective based on the principles, guidelines and practices of Authentic Movement. She has been a co-presenter of this research at the International Festival of Making Theatre in Athens, Greece, Myth and Theatre Festival's Voices Summer University at the Roy Hart International Centre in Malérargues, France, and at the Canadian Association for Theatre Research Conference.

Over the past 18 years she has taught voice, collective creation, movement, and Storytelling at York University’s Theatre Department, the Humber College Comedy School, George Brown Theatre School, The Centre for Indigenous Theatre, University of Toronto, The Pro Actor’s Lab and Canada’s National Ballet School. Cindy also coaches privately with industry professionals. Her pedagogical interest is the synthesis of movement and voice in performance training, and her work as Vocal Coach for Fujiwara Dance Inventions, has been a highlight in her research of the body/ voice connection, linking Butoh and classical vocal principles.

Cindy Block studied Acting at the Herbert Berghof Studio in New York and York University in Toronto. She is a veteran actor of the Canadian stage, having played over 40 professional roles and was co-founder of P.I.E. Theatre in Vancouver, B.C. As a performer, she has participated in the development of many new Canadian works; and at the heart of her artistic journey is a deep belief in the potential for theatre and storytelling to support vibrant and difficult dialogue and to help us recognize both our differences and our universal experiences.